Air Sealing

Air Sealing greatly reduces air infiltration, the outside air that enters a house uncontrollably through cracks and openings. 

Knee walls require backing that is sealed at seams, cracks or gaps. This includes the top, bottom, and sides where the contacts studs or top and bottom plates.

If there are holes or cracks made in the backer, they should be sealed.

Wall block sealing

Floor block sealing

All backer should be continuous and free of holes or gaps. Best practice is to also seal the backer with caulk, spray foam or tape.

All blocking should be cut to fit very tight or sealed with foam or caulk (not tape). 

Chase sealing 1

Air sealing with fiberglass

Holes in the envelope should be sealed with caulk, spray foam, or tape. Fiberglass insulation is not an acceptable sealant.

Conduit Sealing 2

Conduit sealing 1

All holes made for wires and pipes should be sealed in the building envelope.

All holes made for wires and pipes should be sealed in the building envelope.

 Lighting sealingDry wall sealing

 Light fixtures should be sealed to prevent air leakage.

The top plate should be sealed using sill seal or caulking to prevent air leakage (wall wash) between the stud wall and the drywall.

Sill sealing

Window Sealing

The floor should be sealed with sill seal or caulk. 

Windows and doors should be sealed with spray foam in the gaps of the window or door and the opening in the framed wall.